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Tag: Bucknell

Introductory Markup Experiments

Posted in Digital Pedagogy

This week in my HUMN 100 course we began the TEI module, which will see students tagging individual anecdotes in “Tarlton’s Jests” and compiling them into a digital edition. We’ve been wrestling with some computer problems this term that have made the round-table collaborative nature of last fall’s course a bit harder to sustain. Several students have had to work on the lab PCs around the edge of the room, which means their backs are to me, and they’re not connecting with one another, either.

Linn: the Next Generation

Posted in Digital Pedagogy, and Teaching

It’s been a while since I’ve written anything – mainly for lack of time and other writing deadlines, but also because I’ve been unsure what to write about in this space. I was hesitant to write about the course I taught in the fall while I was teaching it, and I’ve been cautious about writing anything professionally-oriented: so many people are writing (oftentimes articulately and also at times in incendiary tones) about alt-ac and DH and the state of higher education and the lack of jobs and and and … I just don’t feel like getting into a social media exchange about it. So I’ve just done a lot of sharing of other peoples’ FB posts and tweets.
But now spring is (supposedly) coming, and I’m starting to think about co-presenting on the first iteration of Humanities 100 with Katie Faull this summer at ACH and DH, and thought it might be a good time to write about teaching and learning again.

The un/translatability of code?

Posted in Reflections

This week I participated in the Comparative Humanities summer reading seminar at Bucknell organized by Katie Faull, along with Elizabeth Armstrong, John Hunter, Nick Kupensky, Alf Siewers, James Shields, Meenakshi Ponnuswami, and Slava Yastremski. The theme of the seminar was “Untranslatability.” I have no facility with Translation Studies nor with the German and Russian and Japanese flying around the room all week, and the discourse about World Literature was certainly outside of my wheelhouse, but it was exhilarating to take the time to sit with colleagues and engage in sometimes heated and always exhilarating discussions about the challenging, dense readings by Elizabeth Apter, Barbara Cassin, Susan Bassnett and Harish Trivedi, Franco Moretti, and others. It was fantastic and exhausting, and by the end of this afternoon’s session (as so often happens) I didn’t want it to end.

Developing a Digital Resource

Posted in Digital Humanities, and Digital Pedagogy

Once upon a time there lived a man named James Merrill Linn.

James Merrill Linn
James Merrill Linn (1833-1897)

He was a lawyer, a member of a prominent family in town, a soldier, a collector of historical factoids and memorabilia. He wrote. And wrote. He wrote letters and journals and memoirs and essays. He wrote contracts and deeds and wills. And, it seems, he saved everything. He saw himself as a witness to history, as someone whose actions and observations were of value in the documentation of that history. After his death someone in his family gathered all of these life papers together and donated them to his university, thinking – perhaps – that someone else would recognize the importance of his words and deeds.

Digital Learning in an Undergraduate Context:

Posted in Conferences, Digital Humanities, and Digital Pedagogy

… promoting long term student-faculty (and community) collaboration in the Susquehanna Valley

This is the transcript of the paper that Katie Faull and I presented on July 9, 2014 at DH2014 in Lausanne, Switzerland. We are currently expanding this paper into an article for publication. The PowerPoint slides that accompanied our presentation are included at the end of this post.

INTRODUCTION
At several sessions and discussions at the 2014 Digital Humanities Summer Institute we noticed a marked increase in discussions focusing on teaching Digital Humanities; namely, how do we effectively port the tools and methodologies with which we work as researchers into the undergraduate classroom. Simultaneously, the question gradually shifted from “DO we teach Digital Humanities to undergraduates?” to “HOW do we teach Digital Humanities to undergraduates?”